Friday, September 21, 2012

Free Discount Prescription Drug Card

I found this information via Twitter- it was originally posted by
 the National Association of School Nurses.


This free discount prescription drug card program is intended to help people:

“ lower their prescription drug costs. This is NOT insurance. 
This is a discount program that works at a large number of pharmacies and grocery stores.  
This card can be provided to anyone associated with the school(s) that you serve. 
You, your family, staff members, volunteers, any or all students and their families.”



I imagine it is similar to having a Kroger card scanned or using a coupon at Kohl's!

When you click on this link; you will see a screen similar to this:


Scroll down the page until you see a box like this:



Complete the required fields & click on the 'create prescription card button'.
You will then see your personalized card; similar to this with a print card option!
You can make personalized cards for everyone in your family too!


As you can see, many pharmacies
have agreed to be a part of this program; including...



Hope this information helps
you or someone you know!

 


Pin It!

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Emergency Bag for School Nurses



I've worked in 4 schools (2 JR Highs and 2 High Schools- currently at a high school)
and health emergencies tend to be similar regardless of what school I am in!
 
A staff member uses a 'call button' or phone to call the office responsible
for all emergencies (usually the main office of the dean's office).
In a health emergency they frantically say "We need The Nurse"....
then The Nurse is called via a walkie talkie to report to Room # for an emergency.

However, 99.8% of the time I am never told what the emergency consists of!
This used to bother me because I felt as though I was walking into the unknown;
but anymore I'm OK with not knowing- I'm ready regardless of the situation.
 
Here are some examples of emergencies I've been called to help with over the years:
  • broken bones
  • fainting- especially after a blood drive
  • seizures
  • fights- some are sadly really bad- unconsciousness, broken bones, bleeding- paramedics called kind of bad!
  • strokes- a couple of teachers I've worked with have had strokes @ school. both fully recovered.
  • anxiety attacks
And I'm certain there are more that my memory takes for granted and I'm failing to mention now :)
 
So, I have learned to be mentally prepared to walk into anything and
I also need to have supplies with me to treat a variety of situations when I arrive.
 
To help me feel prepared I have arranged an "Emergency Bag"
always stocked and ready to 'grab n' go!' to any emergency. 
I also always bring my walkie talkie to keep in touch
with the LPN (yes, I'm spoiled!) who stays in the nurse's office
eagerly waiting my updates. 
She knows that no news is good news &
something I can handle without help from the outside (ie the local paramedics).
Also, the school security office (a former EMT and firefighter- spoiled again)
 meets me at the call and typically one of the deans arrives too.
 
 
This bag was left for me to use by the nurse I replaced when she left after 14 years service!
I'm not sure where she purchased it, but it works out great!
When kids or staff members see me in the halls with this on my shoulder they know I'm
headed to a situation and they make room for me in the hallways-
which as you know can be really crowded sometimes!
 
 
Here is the bag unzipped- it opens all the way open and so I can see everything I have inside.
And what is "everything you wonder"...Let's see-
  • BP cuff & stethoscope
  • Pulse Ox from the 1900s- but it works great!
  • Liquid Benadryl
  • Penlights
  • Instant Ice Packs
  • GLOVES
  • gauze pads
  • band aids
  • Glucometer
  • Glucose Tablets
  • Lancets
  • Alcohol Pads
  • chewable Baby Aspirin
  • CPR mask
  • Pen- to write with
  • Paper- to write on
 
I am also lucky enough to have standing orders for the items mentioned above
and a few more that aren't mentioned too!
 
As for teacher classrooms- they are offered
gloves and band aids to keep on hand (no pun intended!).
We don't have an actual classroom emergency kit at this point in time-
maybe we will make something in the future;
I'm not sure what our Safety Committee will decide.
Pin It!

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Real quick, I just need....

I work with high school kiddos, AKA=Teenagers, all day long!
 
 
Sometimes, some of them believe when they
don't feel good they have permission to:
  1. act rude
  2. roll their eyes - yes I can see you do that :)
  3. exhale really loudly- as if they want the main office staff to hear them... Why I wonder? I don't know, maybe they think someone from the main office will come down and help them faster than I can?
  4. stand in the doorway and stare at me- I mean really just stare to the point it almost feels uncomfortable- while I am helping someone else.  Why?  Again, I don't know, maybe they think their starting eyes will make me work faster? 
Really, the list could go on and on.
 
What I want to remind all of the kids who need something in the Health Center
is that each one of them will get their own turn.
They might have to wait 5 minutes, but if they need 5 minutes when
it is their turn- they will get 5 full minutes of my attention!
 
 
Please be patient while you are waiting to be the patient!
 
And also...
 
Right Click, Save, & Print if you want- it is an 8x8 print
but would fit on an 8 1/2x11 paper cut to size.
 
I saw a similar phrase somewhere on Pinterest,
pinned by someone who follows me (thanks KS!)
& just had to make my own sign to hang in my office.
 
 
     
Pin It!

Thursday, September 6, 2012

Pediculosis...

Pediculosis....
Sounds so fancy, doesn't it?
Well, I suppose..... if you don't know what it means!
 
However, if you do know what it means you are
probably scratching your head right now!
Pediculosis = Head Lice
 
The kids are back at school and
they brought some bugs with them too!
 
I always stress to teachers that
head lice cannot jump or fly...
they can only crawl.
 
So one must be rubbing heads,
sharing combs/brushes, jackets, head phones, hats,
scarves, blankets, masks (as in Halloween masks),
& more things similar to those listed above.
 
This information makes the teacher feel better-
but they still leave my office scratching their heads!
 
This picture shows only the eggs of head lice & no live lice-
I couldn't find a good picture of the live bugs on the hair/scalp.
Believe me though- once you've seen them you'll always
remember what they look like!
 
Want to learn more about head lice?
The link below offers some great education material-
great resource for staff, teachers, and parents!
 
Pin It!
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...